Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit 45 Rue Desgranges 93100 Montreuil France Tel : 00.33.(0)1.43.62.75.42  Mob: 06 13 12 43 22 wpetit@sfr.fr

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

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David Rubio (born David Joseph Spinks; 1934 - 21 October 2000) was an English maker of stringed musical instruments.

 

His creations included guitars, lutes, harpsichords, theorbos, vihuelas, citterns, panduras, and finally also violins, violas and cellos.

His instruments were prized during his lifetime by many fine musicians, including the English lutenist and guitarist Julian Bream.

The Rubio Quartet named themselves in his honour.

David Rubio was born in London, UK, and acquired his new surname in his twenties while professionally playing flamenco guitar, which he had learned studying in Seville with, among others, the guitarist Pepe Martínez.

 

In the early 1960s he traveled from Spain to New York as accompanist for the Rafael de Cordoba flamenco dance company.

While in New York, Rubio abandoned playing in favor of the construction of guitars and established his first workshop on Carmine Street in New York's Greenwich Village. Eventually he returned to England and set up a workshop near Oxford, later relocating it to Cambridge.

Over time he expanded his repertoire to include the various other instruments mentioned above.

With the help of eminent Cambridge scientists, he investigated many aspects of the technology of instrument-making, such as aspects of classical violin varnish and ground layer, in his attempt to re-create the classical sound and appearance of the old Cremonese instruments.

 

Classical Guitar David Rubio

  

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