Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit 45 Rue Desgranges 93100 Montreuil France Tel : 00.33.(0)1.43.62.75.42  Mob: 06 13 12 43 22 wpetit@sfr.fr

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

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Cornets and Trumpets

Besson, Courtois, Guichard, Piatet, Finck, Muller, Kretzschmann, Aubertin, Couesnon, Gautrot, Selmer, King, Bach

 

The cornet was initially derived from the post horn around 1820 in France. Among the first manufacturers of modern cornets was Parisian Jean Asté in 1828. Cornets first appeared as separate instrumental parts in 19th century French compositions.

 

This instrument could not have been developed without the improvement of piston valves by Heinrich Stöelzel and Friedrich Blühmel.

In the early 19th century these two instrument makers almost simultaneously invented the valves still used today.

 

The first notable virtuoso player was Jean-Baptiste Arban, who studied the cornet extensively and published

La grande méthode complète de cornet à piston et de saxhorn, commonly referred to as the Arban method, in 1864.

Up until the early 20th century, the trumpet and cornet coexisted in musical ensembles.

Symphonic repertoire often involves separate parts for trumpet and cornet.

 

As several instrument builders made improvements to both instruments, they started to look and sound more alike.

The modern day cornet is used in brass bands, concert bands, and in specific orchestral repertoire that requires a more mellow sound.

The instrument was once sometimes referred to as a cornopean, referencing the earliest cornets with the Stöelzel valve system.

 

The modern trumpet has valves that allow it to play the same notes and fingerings as the cornet

Cornets and trumpets made in a given key (usually the key of Bb) play at the same pitch, and the technique for playing the instruments is nearly identical. However, cornets and trumpets are not entirely interchangeable, as they differ in timbre.

Also available, but usually seen only in the brass band, is an Eb soprano model, pitched a fourth above the standard Bb

 

 

 Antique French Cornet

by Auguste Raoux

Photo

  Antique French Cornet Cornet

3 Berlin valves system Sax

and set of crooks, detachable bell,

in the original case. 

Photo

Sold

  

 Antique French Cornet

by Kretzschmann à Strasbourg 

Photo

Sold

 

 

 

 

Antique French Cornet 3 Stúlzel valves

by Gaubert à Lille 

Photo

Sold

 

 

  Natural Trumpet

 Photo

Sold

 Bass Trumpet by Thibouville 

Photo

 

 Cornopean by Finck Strasbourg

 Photo

Sold

 

 

 

 Cornopean by Muller 3 Stoelzel valves

 Photo

Sold

 

 

 Trumpets

Couesnon Monople

  King Liberty 

Aubertin

 

Sold

 

 

 

Natural Trumpet By Potter 1836/37

 

Sold

 

 

Aubertin Trumpet C / Bb

 

Sold

 

 

Couesnon Trumpet Ut/Bb/La

 

Sold

Selmer Trumpet C/Bb Sabarich Modèle

 

Sold

Selmer Trumpet C/Bb Sabarich Modèle

 

Sold

Trumpets

 

Aubertin in C

Couesnon C/Bb/La

Rampone C/Bb 

 

Sold

17.JPG

Cornet Piatet à Lyon

 

Sold

Cornet Halary

 

Sold

Cornet Gautrot

 

Sold

Cornet Courtois

 

Sold

Neo Cor

 

Sold

Cornet Gand à Laval

Two valves

 

Sold

Cornet Halary-Sudre

Compensateur

 

Sold

Cornet Courtois

 

Sold

 

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